THE SEAL OF THE
Engineers Seal
CORPS OF ENGINEERS

The Seal of the Army Corps of Engineers is often referred to as the coat of arms. It was adopted shortly after the Civil War to commemorate the consolidation of the Corps of Topographic Engineers and the regular Corps of Engineers. In 1831 the Topographical Corps was removed from the original corps which had been in existence since 1802. In 1866 the "Topogs" as they were called, re-joined the Corps of Engineers and General A. A. Humphries adopted the present seal.

The significance of the design is plain. The large shield is divided into three horizontal sections, of which the top is solid blue; the bottom is divided into 13 vertical stripes, in red and white. The center section shows the original shields of the two separate corps, the left side representing the traditional Engineers through the design on their button. On the right is the red, white, and blue shield with capitol "T" and "E" of the Topographic Engineers. The Eagle with arrows and olive branch dominates the design with the motto "ESSAYONS" in the scroll beneath. The Oak and Laurel branches symbolize strength and victory. The seal was officially adopted by the Corps on 6 April, 1897.

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